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, the presidential election the main event, starting with eight serious republican candidates vying for the nomination. ethnic voters flexed their political muscle, giving president obama an unexpectedly early election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell fl
honorees at the white house. after that, pulling in the presidential election. then, an event about women in leadership. >> next, a tribute to this year's kennedy center honorees at the white house reception. individual awards are given to individuals for their lifetime achievement in performing arts. this year, best of hoffman and david letterman. -- dustin hoffman and david letterman. [applause] >> david letterman. >> natalia mackarova. [applause] >> led zepliln. [applause] -- led zeplin. ♪ >> ladies and of lead, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. [applause] >> hello. hello. thank you. thank you. thank you so much. thank you. thank you. thank you. great. everybody please have a seat. thank you. good evening, everybody. you all look lovely. welcome to the white house on a night when i am no where close to being the main attraction. thank you, david rubenstein, michael kaiser, and the kennedy center trusties and everyone who has worked so hard to hold president kennedy's commitment to supporting the arts. i also want to recognize another one of president kennedy
. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
. when newt was elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican today was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something t
. >> it was the will of the house to do nothing? on thursday night, the members of the elected house of representatives decided it would you describe not their will to take a vote on their own leadership's proposal. it would have exempted the first million dollars of income from a tax increase. there was no chance of being passed into law as the president made clear he would veto it. if the speaker's plan b passed the democrat controlled senate. this was a republican proposal. house democrats would not have supported it. democrats couldn't agree to vote on it. instead, they walked out and went home for the holidays. forget about bipartisanship, this house couldn't achieve partisanship. as the speaker explained it, his fellow republicans wouldn't vote on the proposal because they didn't want to be perceived as tax raisers. now, the speaker is at a loss. >> many of us believe on both sides of the aisle, the tax code will help us get our economy working faster and put more americans back to work and more americans with tax rules. how we get there, god only knows. >> god only knows? mr. speaker, you're supposed to
. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candidates with millions of dollars, including mitt romney, and though lost. >> how many millions? >> all total? >> five or something? i think it's in the neighborhood of the 70s. >> yeah. >> right. he is moving along. the biggest loser of 2012 lance armstrong for using performance-enhancing drugs. armstrong was stripped of his tour de france titles and sponsor contracts worth 15 to $18 million. biggest loser. >>> okay. best politician. >> wisconsin governor scott walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't w
apart. many republicans feel they were elected under a pledge not to raise taxes no matter what. democrats were elected under a pledge that everyone over a quarter million dollars has to have their taxes locked in. once we come back, actually right now talks are going on right now i'm sure between the staffs of the speaker and the white house. it is not as if nothing has been done. if people want a deal they can have it. if not, it can be difficult. i say it is 50/50. >> one thing you have been following are the hearings on libya. hillary clinton, secretary of state has a virus, a con cuss, and wasn't -- a concussion and wasn't able to testify. at this point, what do you think we will learn from the secretary that we are not learning from these hearings? is libya something that will stay with her should she decide to have a run next go around? >> of all of the members on the cabinet, i think secretary clinton is probably the most able and has done the best job. obviously she has questions to answer in benghazi. the report was accurate. i don't believe it did reach her. she has a
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
was thinking slower-elect, you know what i'm saying? >> remember this humble moment. [laughter] say that one more time. >> what does it mean to you personally [inaudible] -- >> i think what it means to me personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there
. >> after a few words of advice at home the bay area's newly elected congressman is about to get a crash course in washington politics. how the young lawmaker thinks he can help what many consider a broken system. ======b r e a k >> on tap for the next 24 hours more rain and i guess some big waves, too right, liz? >> we have a high surf advisory in effect for tomorrow. in the meantime we've got cold temperatures, overcast skies, a live look over the pleasanton area. we have wet weather heading our way. we'll show you coming up. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, the fiscal cliff. the dow is _ _ this marks the longt losing >>> stocks once again heading lower for a fifth day on those concerns about the fiscal cliff. the dow is down 106 plus points marking the longest losing streak in three months. >>> former bay area city councilman is about to learn firsthand how washington works or doesn't work. he is newly elected congressman heading on to the capitol hill quagmire. cbs5 reporter juliette goodrich talked to elect eric st -- eric swelwell. >> it is avoidable. >> reporter: he said he's ready to bring som
more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the triumph of free-market economics. of course there was a little premature considering what happened since 2008. we had to revise that. >> how is this book organized? >> well, initially when i tried to do was create an alternative to robert popular book of world philosophers. i wish i had that title. it's the story
confidently as it indicated they won the election campaigning on this very issue and that's all that they had at stake was trying to bring to the american people what they claim was the real agenda in the course of the campaign, extend the bush era tax cuts for making more than $250,000 and whatever the republicans want to say about them, they're fine to say and right now the republicans continue with a lot of sniping directed at this white house. earlier today, senators corker and alexander making statements basically blaming them for the stalemate, taking place right now. but i think it's pretty clear that the white house feels confidently that even if they don't have control of the house, they have enough republicans in the house that if a vote were allowed there, that with the democrats all supporting the president and enough republicans they could move this thing. >> krystal? >> reporter: can i take a whack at that question, please? it's mike viqueira. the question is, did the president know and as charles krauthammer outlined, you know, that he was going to crush the republican oppositi
circumstances. >> this is outside of the book but i will do it anyway because i've been doing general election for the times. talking to jim messina the campaign manager of the obama campaign and david axelrod and rahm emanuel and stephanie cutter and asking them you know, how would the next years under obama, given that the house composition -- >> is almost certainly going to be similar. >> how will things be different and uniformly their answer, in other words the talking point, was that the fever will break, that the american people if they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionist and the republicans will get the message and they will walk in a sultry fashion toward the center of. >> i can see that happening at all. >> no, no and if that is her talking point and they are siding with the. >> are you optimistic to say that governor romney would have one that there is and you waiting for him after he gets into office? >> no, no i'm not and i wrote a story for "the new york times magazine" on governor romney and specifically on his kind of
consideration to drafting shriver as his running mate in the 1964 election. but the kennedy family so most historians tell us wanted to robert kennedy to assume political leadership, and eventually hubert humphrey to the vice presidency. shortly after the election, johnson asked shriver to head the war on poverty. some of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
play here. i don't see him behaving as a rational leader on this. >> there's no election for 22 months and as everyone knows, polls now about predictable capacity in november of 2014 are useless and the republicans know they can be incredibly unpopular and in defacto terms, changes nothing in washington other than unpopular. unpopular in october of 2014, they have a problem. if they're unpopular in january of 2013, you have gridlock in washington. >> who makes the next move? >> senator mcconnell's probably in the best position. he's in very close touch with the president, the white house and democrats in both the senate and the house have been in very close coordination throughout this. they have been in lockstep. it was interesting to note that when we saw the plan "b" chaos just before christmas the house democrats stood firm. they stood united. historically, that's not the play of the democratic party but that does seem to be where the democrats are right now. the president is back today so there can be an opportunity for some discussions to resume. but boehner has made it clear tha
'm the newly-elected president of the united states who has a legacy to think about why wooir take that chance? certainly my friends on capitol hill on the republican side of the aisle have come to the reerlization that the president is prepared to take them over the fiscal cliff which is why you have the boehner move. i don't understand why you'd want to start the presidency with the potential of going over a fiscal cliff that could potentially put us into a recession. why not work a deal for the short term. why not look to do something more broad based next year? >> it would be been good to do it two months ago but the reality is, there's always risk. realistically if we take 5 to be 10, 20 days. the markets panic over everything. i assume these are rational actors. even if the market goes down 3 or 4%, markets fluctuate all the time. it goes down one day and back the next week and the impact on the economy is the same thing as my decision to go out to dinner next week. >> i disagree with that statement. it goes down 3 or 4% and then a lot of wealth has been destroyed. >> but it comes back.
for election. everybody else is pretty much locked in whether we go over the cliff or not. is it thelma and louuisuise or laverne and shirley? they all place their bets a year-and-a-half ago. the election decided it. host: thank you for the call. bill has this point. we are down to the wire in terms of negotiations. jackie is joining us from georgia. caller: good morning. i cannot believe i got through. i have been trying for so long. host: thank you for being persistent. caller: the guy from the newspaper is wrong. we are not stupid. we know what is going on. i am 71 years old. i'm so worried about going down and being a third-world country. john boehner has to get his act together. he is not worried about anything. and the tea party -- give me a break. they are not worried about anything but taking us down. i still cannot believe i got to talk to you guys. thank you for listening. if obama could run again, i would vote for him again. he wants to do something. the republicans do not. if a republican was in the white house, there would not be any worry about paying for sandy, unemployme
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially re
presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in
9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal abyss. i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were able to work together that way, crossing party lines, crossing with the id administration wanted done or what the caucus leadership on both sides wanted done, it showed we had a certain independence. i will never forget the late senator robert sitting in an office with us all together, sobbing, saying, we saved the senate. we came to an a
to know my italian friends introduce me as david chiu o. 20 years ago like every elected that didn't grow up in san francisco and i know we are all from different areas i came here 20 years ago from the east coast and in part i was fascinated by chinatown and it's next to the old italian neighborhood of north beach and in the great cities like boston et cetera and when i walked around that neighborhood it was the neighborhood that drew me to the great city whether being reminded of great baseball players, the joe migage i don't play ground. >> >> or the fisherman or the piazza that i look forward to work with angela to lobby the mayor to adequately fund it. there are special quarters that come from the community that are represented tonight and i am happy to come and raise a glass to all of you and look forward to cel celebrating the italian. >> american history. thank you. >> good evening. i am verna patty. i am coming from congresswoman pelosi's office. she is celebrating in washington dc the italian culture with the minister. "dr. friends greetings as you. >> >> gather in san fran
skills. we thank the local state and federal offices before hosting an intern and we think of the elected officials for their continued leadership and for opening the door for mentoring are new leaders. please join me in congratulating and welcoming the internships class of 2012. will you please join me on stage? [applause] mayor, will you join us for a photograph, please? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. one more round of applause. [applause] if you look around you tonight, you will see poster board. celebrating, acknowledging, the first asian americans. we have the first asian-american actress in hollywood. the first asian-american nba player. the first members of congress. these interns are the future of our community. they are the reason why we are here today. we're also here to celebrate and recognize one of the greatest members of our community. this year it is the first year we are giving the lifetime achievement award. the lifetime achievement award this year is going to secretary norman manetta. he is a trailblazer. a man who paved the way for many of us. he was the
election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a car. -- survived a the horror. asheville, north carolina, republican line. caller: i would like to say one thing and i think there is a connection that people are overlooking -- i think people especially recently and as far back as timothy mcveigh and the people who crashed into the tent -- twin towers, they are terrorists. terrorist attacks society by creating fear, mayhem, and everything else. is the united states overlooking this? are we creating terrorists? beene young people have t attacking people with assault rif
on it for us. for more on this let's bring in the editor of "campaigns & elections" magazine, shane deapril. campaigns and elections might be appropriate here because some say there is a lot of political posturing going on. you have said the feeling in washington it might actually be better to go over the cliff and come back and negotiate. why? >> yeah. now, this is of course purely political campaign calculation here, tossing aside the nation's fiscal health frankly. for both side i think there is good argument to be made for congressional leaders, democratic leaders and republican leaders in particular, there may be less political risk here actually if we do go over the cliff and figure out a solution very quickly afterwards. if you go back to what happened with plan b, speaker boehner could not get, get that through his caucus in the house simply because you have many republican members sitting in very conservative districts who would absolutely not vet for anything that could put them at risk of a primary challenge in a year from now. frankly, for a lot of those members, voting for plan
presentation by informing them that his poetry had been dedicated to the president-elect, mr. john finley [laughter] frost had inadvertently stated the name of a scholar from harvard. findlay new frost and may have been a friend of frost. but he was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here's a picture of washington's inauguration the first one in 79 that place in the capitol at the time. the next inaugurations took place in philadelphia and the first one in washington was in 1801. now there is a mess, a legend of the george washington so help me god at the end of the los. but there is no proof that he said that. out of the four words at the time it's come to be a tradition at least from 1933 to the present those words have been added at the end of the los. this is 1929 coming in on the left is the chief justice william howard taft and he is administering the oath of office to the new president herbert hoover. he's the only person ever to be both president and chief justice and you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitution that he said cruisers, maintain and defend and this
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
've had the opportunity working with their folks in their states and all around the country, to elect some new people to the senate that are bringing the right ideas and some new voices to those principles that we know have made our country successful. and so i feel like as i leave the senate that we are leaving it better than we found it and that our focus now, despite the difficult challenges, is really on america and how we turn america around. i should spend a lot of time and most of my time on thanking my staff. i have to say that my greatest inspirations have come from the staff that i've had the opportunity to serve with in the house and the senate. as all of you know who are serving here in the senate, this country is being run by people in their 20's and 30's who get us so busy that they're having to follow us to meetings to tell us where we're going and what we'll be talking about. but it's incredible to see that these young people, particularly those that i've served with, have such a passion for our country and freedom, and they're willing to put it all on the baseline to make
, no one is coming behind him and senator mcconnell, the republican leader of the senate is up for re-election and as we saw in the senate race in kentucky a few years ago, he may have to worry about a challenge from the right if he supports a tax increase. i think president obama is doing the only sane thing he can, which is reach out to the speaker and he controls the house and, that is -- and the good news for the president is the public seems by all the polls, by the fact the election came out the way it did, to be in his corner, not the speaker's. >> rick: the president -- you want to weigh in on that? >> i just -- >> rick: americans are in favor of raising taxes on the wealthiest americans and, the president did win, november 6th. >> we have seen polls that say that, they approve tax reform and want to see real entitlement reform and want to get spending under control. but, president obama has failed to bring anything up to the -- on the table, and, especially the democrats, they have been silently on entitlement reform and silent on the spending cuts and as we know, we can talk about ra
did and many members of our caucus lost their election because of that. they live in areas which just -- they understood when they took that vote that it was over. including jack brooks. king in his district, but as chairman of the committee, he saw the need to bring that bill to the floor and he lost his election, as strong as he was in this that district. after the election, members came and he said i would do it again. i would do it again. how unimportant is my political life compared to saving the lives of -- and for 10 years, there was no -- there was a ban on assault weapons. and for 10 years, you didn't see this regular demonstration of violence in this high capacity way. when we were no longer in a position to renew it, that became clear, we started to see the violence escalate in the past decade because you know it expired in 2004. i just would like to say if you would like to say something about how you saw things in the aftermath, because i think they are asking about then and now and the change. >> congress has not acted or been able to act post 1984. >> listen. i was not
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
attribute to the sun as far as his leadership abilities? joseph kabila, who was recently elected in 2011, which many characterized as a rigged election -- what do we know about the current president, and why do we support leaders in africa to exploit their citizens and the poverty that in sue's makes them more susceptible -- ensues makes them more susceptible to extremist elements, like al-qaeda? you will receive 100 virgins when you do the suicide attack, and whatnot. how can we get ourselves out of this, america? somebody talk to me, please. >> i think you are right. this is part of a generation of african leaders that are not going to move their countries forward. this is an issue of economic freedom. y have the opportunity,rtunit we're going to keep coming back here. from my perspective, mr. affleck is sitting on the far right, but i am okay with that. [applause] >> to ask the question about the character of joseph kabila -- i first met him in 2001. he came to me with secretary powell, and they sat in the secretary's office soldier to soldier. joseph kabila laid out a vision of what
to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly than their elected representatives are. >> now, the first family on their way to hawaii for the holidays. the president says he'll return to washington if there's a deal. >>> there were five funerals in newtown, connecticut, today for two adults and three children. six-year-old olivia engle loved being a big sister and helping her little brother explore. dillon loved chocolate. grace's family says she dreamed of being a painter. >>> we started to see all the ribbons and all your tributes to emily, everywhere, and a lot of you guys don't even know who she is. a lot of you never even met her. >> the last two faculty members were also laid to rest today. rachel's boyfriend was planning to propose on christmas eve. school psychologist mary sherlock was remembered for her devotion to kids in trouble. >>> condolence letters have overwhelmed the newtown post office. they started coming immediately. at first, a few hundred. now there are thousands each and every day, coming from all over the world. the postmaster says it's hard not to cry
pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me becaus
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